What to do with exhumed skeletons of more than 14,000 bodies from the time of the Black Plague? For woodcarver František Rint, the grisly task was his to handle the bones nearly 300 years after a half-blind monk unearthed them.

The result? The Sedlec Ossuary, or the Church of Bones.

Church of Bones

The entryway to the thousands of bones beneath

Located about an hour train ride from Prague in the quaint town of Kutna Hora (a UNESCO World Heritage site), today the Sedlec Ossuary is one of the town’s biggest draws.

Skulls in the Church of Bones

And, for good reason. These bones, to the tune of between 40 and 70,000 are, um, artistically arranged below the Cemetery Church of All Saints.

The Sedlec Ossuary

There are four large areas where bones are piled to the ceiling, and then, in the middle of the Ossuary, is a macabre chandelier using every bone in the human body.

The chandelier inside the Church of Bones

Creepy? Yes. Fascinating? Absolutely.

A skeleton at the Church of Bones

The Sedlec Ossuary is mentioned in guidebooks, on hostel bulletin boards … everywhere. And, despite its huge crowds, the site is definitely one to experience while visiting Prague.

Skulls at the Church of Bones

Getting there: Head to Prague’s Central Station and then hop a train to Kutna Hora. For further exploration — and the town itself is worth exploring — skip the long walk from the Church of Bones to the town — and opt for the local tram which transports those to the medieval nook. There are plenty of restaurants and attractions within the town to explore for a few hours. You don’t need an entire day in Kutna Hora, and not even an hour at the Church of Bones.

This post is part of  the D Travels Europe series. Stay up-to-date on all of my European adventures by following along on Twitter (#dtravelseurope), Instagram,TroverG+ and Facebook. And, for a look at the health and wellness side of European travel, be sure to follow along at The Comfort Zone Project and on TCZP’s Facebook.

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