The medieval Skoja Loka in Slovenia
It’s hitting that magnificent Golden Hour when we arrive to Škofja Loka (Slovene for Bishop’s Meadow), a medieval city only 25 km from Ljubljana.

The day has been a long one, starting with exploring Bled Castle, then on to Vintgar Gorge, exploring Lake Bohinj and Lake Bled to soak up the storybook landscape it offers.

I barely can muster the energy to unbuckle my seatbelt, but when I see the tiny town and its castle a top the highest point, I channel what’s left of my energy to get out and look at the quaint surroundings.

We cross a bridge high over the Selca Sora River and into town and are greeted with the square, complete with outdoor cafes and the signature linden tree which apparently marks the town square. Since it is a Sunday, the only things open are the restaurants, and they are packed with people enjoying the early evening weather.

The quiet center of Skofja Loka

The rest of the main part of town is quiet. Sealed off to vehicles, Slovenia’s most well-preserved medieval city shows it colors beautifully, set against a nearly silent center.

History in Skofja Loka, Slovenia

Škofja Loka dates back more than 1,000 years and was owned for more than 800 by the Bishops of Freising (hence the reference in the town’s name).

The wall of Skofja Loka

A part of the centuries old wall of Škofja Loka

Like most medieval towns, the castle at the top is today a major tourist attraction and home to Loka Museum, which houses the country’s largest collection of historic relics.

The river and entrance to Skofja Loka

This quick stop in town isn’t without its benefits though, namely snapping some photos that show some of its charm.

street-skofja-loka

skofa-loka-slovenia

shop-skofja-loka

Because “Lady Di.”

windows-skofja-loka

Sadly, we are there past opening hours, so like other places in Slovenia, this town of 12,000 is added to my must-return-to spots when I head back to Slovenia.

This post is part of  the D Travels Europe (and Israel) series. Stay up-to-date on all of my adventures by following along on Twitter (#dtravelseurope), Instagram,TroverG+ and Facebook. And, for a look at the health and wellness side of European travel, be sure to follow along at The Comfort Zone Project and on TCZP’s Facebook.

Editor’s Note: I received a special rate with Roundabout to participate in the tour, however all opinions are my own. If you have questions regarding this, please read my disclosure policy

 

4 comments

  1. So beautiful! I love the style of the buildings and the bright colors. It’s a shame everything was closed when you were there but it still looks like it was worth the visit!

    Like

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